Say hello to 2017’s LEGO® Minifigure Series

After much anticipation, the LEGO® Collectable Minifigures Series 17 is finally on shelves.

You can expect a good variety of the quirky and goofy in this set, including Corn Cob Guy and Butterfly Girl, sporting equally hilarious descriptions.

Corn Cob Guy’s description on the LEGO® site wins the prize for the corniest:

“Pop this guy any question about corn, and prepare to be a-maized! He’ll teach you how to plant, grow, reap, cook, pop, eat, dress like, and even act like corn.”

And Butterfly Girl’s description sits firmly in the quirky category:

“Flies like a butterfly, dreams like an entomologist. Can’t wait to grow old enough to raise a pet caterpillar of her own.”

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With another 15 minifigures in this series, there’s plenty of variety. As usual, collecting them can offer a great incentive for the youngster (or even, eternal youngster) in your life needing to get good grades, do their homework and their chores.

The LEGO® Collectable Minifigures Series 17 list:

  1. Battle Dwarf,
  2. Veterinarian,
  3. Circus Strong Man,
  4. Corn Cob Guy,
  5. Elf Girl,
  6. Hot Dog Man,
  7. Gourmet Chef,
  8. Connoisseur,
  9. Rocket Boy,
  10. Retro Spaceman,
  11. Roman Gladiator,
  12. Professional Surfer,
  13. Dance Instructor,
  14. Butterfly Girl,
  15. The Yuppie,
  16. The Highwayman. He was the mystery minifigure that was recently revealed by

LEGO Minifigure Series 17 Highwayman

How old is the LEGO® minifigure?

All this hype had us asking ourselves how the minifigure first came into being in the LEGO® Group’s long history. It turns out that’s almost 40 years with the first minifigure as we know it being released in 1978. Its facial expression is simple: two eyes and a smiling mouth. Three years before that, a version of the minifigure had been released, with the same cylindrical head as the minifigure we know but without moveable arms or legs, and no facial features either.

Watch this quick evolution of the minifigure:

By 1989, according to Gizmodo, new facial features were added to coincide with the release of LEGO® Pirates. The pirate minifigures sported stubble, eyepatches and beards and the female pirates had lipstick. Each wore accessories in the form of hats or carried some kind of weapon. And so the minifigure with its accessories became established.

By 1990, the LEGO® Group had released its first specialised minifigure along with the LEGO® Castle set: the LEGO® ghost. This particular minifigure had a ghost suit which fits over a normal minifigure. Thus, you could assume Corn Cob Guy’s direct descendent goes all the way back to the LEGO® Castle set of 1990.

Watch this video by Gizmodo to see how LEGO® minifigures are produced in the factory:

Order each new LEGO® minifigure from Series 17 at our online shop or
visit our three Cape Town stores.






LEGO® terms and phrases you should know

Cape Town has its very own LEGO® User Group. Launched by Marick Hornsveld, this young organisation’s guiding principle is simple: to create a platform where enthusiasts can share their passion with one another.

“We aim to promote LEGO® as a hobby and learning tool for young and old and grow LEGO®’s footprint in South Africa.” – CapeLUG

Read more about what to expect at CapeLUG.

In celebration of its launch, we take a look at a few concepts and phrases commonly used in LUG circles:

LUG – LEGO User Group

Known in the LEGO® community as LUGs, groups like this act as a way likeminded individuals can share and learn about the vast possibilities around the humble brick.

RLUG – Recognised LEGO® User Group

LUGS are standardised by the LEGO® Ambassador Network into “Recognised LUGS” using three main requirements, namely, that the group be organised for a full 12 months, have no less than 20 members, and lastly, that it participates or hosts a few exhibitions, displays or conventions. The benefits of being a Recognised LUG (RLUG) will mean support for relevant projects and events that the RLUG does.

AFOL – Adult Fans of LEGO®

Adult fans constitute a significant part of the LEGO® community around the world. AFOLs are builders and collectors of LEGO® rather than passive admirers. IF you’re a fan of LEGO® but not quite an adult, then you’ll be known as:

KFOL – Kid Fan of LEGO®
TFOL – Teenaged Fan of LEGO®
YFOL – Young Fan of LEGO®

AFOLs, KFOLs and TFOLs also have names for friends and family that aren’t necessarily as enthusiastic about LEGO® as they are:

NLF – Non-LEGO® Friend
NLSO – Non-LEGO® Significant Other
NLS – Non-LEGO® Spouse

TLG – The LEGO® Group

Even the LEGO® Group has its own abbreviation.

It helps to know a few of the acronyms and abbreviations associated with the actual LEGO® pieces too:


Refers to a typical LEGO® piece used to build.


The protruding nodule on a brick that is used to fit another brick in the building process.


The base on which a LEGO® model is built. Surface area can vary, but is always a third of the height of a single brick.


The famous LEGO® figurine. LEGO minifigure walking

MOC – My Own Creation

Refers to the LEGO® models that are designed and built by LEGO® fans.

LEGO® is filled with abbreviations for all kinds of terms. To find out more of them, visit or

Got any terms you think are essentials for LEGO® enthusiasts to know? Tell us in the comments section below.





5 LEGO® stocking fillers under R150

The excitement is building for those youngsters anticipating a visit from Father Christmas. No doubt, that means that you’re running around trying to find a few key gifts to bring a bit of that Christmas magic home these holidays. If you’re after ideas for smaller gifts to fill those stockings, then you’ve come to the right place.

Here are 5 LEGO® items that will have your gift recipients squealing for joy and which will keep them suitably occupied so that you can put your feet up and enjoy the silly season too:

Friends Party Sets

LEGO Friends Party Styling

These small scenario sets are fun to build and play with. Jewel the cat gets ready for a birthday party in the Party Styling set, while bunnies need to go gift shopping for a friend in the Party Gift Shop set.

Cost: R75 each

Action play

Bionicle Reboot Uxar Creature of Jungle

If construction is something of a fascination, then this Bionicle Reboot star is certainly going to be a hit. Uxar Creature of Jungle has green, sonic crystal wings and posable joints for hours of action-packed playtime.

Cost: R136 each

Key chains galore

LEGO minifigure key chain

For those in the family that remain children at heart, these are a great memento to unwrap at Christmas. Be it Anakin Skywalker from Star Wars, Albus Dumbledore from Harry Potter, a plain LEGO® brick or even a LEGO® Santa, you’ll find a key chain for everyone.

Cost: R69 each

Magnetic minifigures


“Stop! Police!” Will be the phrase you’ll be hearing a-plenty with this three-piece police minifigure magnet set. They’re a great way to get the kids interested in the charts and tables you set up during term time, so are a must for those parents looking to do a little more planning in 2017.

Cost: R146 each

Mixels of amazingness

LEGO Mixels Lewt

These fun-loving creatures ignite the imagination and make for great collectibles too. Get one or two Mixels and see the fun begin! We’re personally hoping for the treasure hoarding Mixel Lewt and the one-eyed flying horse type creature Paladum to land up in our stockings this Christmas.

Cost: R55 each

Order any of these items at our online store.


Sort and store your LEGO smartly

It’s every LEGO® enthusiast’s struggle: where to put all those pieces. Many of us opt to throw them all in one great container only to curse ourselves later on when we’re trying to find that one important piece. It’s a no-brainer to sort your LEGO® pieces out once and for all so that you’ll never interrupt a build with a lengthy and frustrating search again. Here are a few great pointers to help you get started:

Keep your minifigures intact

If you’re into collectible LEGO® sets then this is for you. Those one-off edition mini-figures have specific accessories and artwork that’s worth preserving. Keep them the way they came by placing them all upright onto standard LEGO® platforms. Not only will you prevent scratching or reduce the risk of losing accessories, you’ll also be able to see them all at one glance for easy selection later on.

Decide on a sort approach

How you sort your LEGO® bricks is up to you. A common method is to store pieces by size and colour to make them easier to find.

It’s important to take into consideration your preferred uses for specific pieces and colours to ensure you have no difficulty finding them when you’re in the middle of a build.

In fact, take a moment before you start the sorting process to plan exactly how you are going to sort pieces to save yourself from any confusion later on.

LEGO® storage choices

Stackable plastic containers are the most practical option. You can find a range of sizes and designs at plastic warehouses such as Mambo’s or Plastics for Africa.

If you’re feeling especially industrious and are keen to make your own storage unit, consider making each unit front transparent so that it is easy to see what is in each.

Find more inspiration on how to sort your LEGO® collection by watching this video of an architect’s LEGO® filled basement:

Got some of your own LEGO® storage tips? Share them with us in the comments below.