Why LEGO® DUPLO® bricks are the bridge for better building

It’s a common question many parents have when it comes to introducing their toddler to LEGO® bricks:

Should we start with LEGO® DUPLO® sets or skip straight to LEGO® sets?

The general assumption is that kids are likely to play with LEGO® bricks from toddler to teenage-hood. We often don’t even consider that LEGO® DUPLO® bricks offer the same longevity. After all, their design is compatible with LEGO® bricks and therefore a valuable element in the building process. There are even convertors which allow for LEGO® DUPLO® bricks to be used with other older LEGO® sets.

Adults love LEGO® DUPLO® pieces too

Many adult fans of LEGO® (AFOLs) make use of LEGO® DUPLO® pieces in their MOCs usually to fill out a large structure, since LEGO® DUPLO® bricks interlock with LEGO® bricks and are also the same colours. Brick Blogger expands on how LEGO® DUPLO® sets will grow with you.

This LEGO® DUPLO® cow jumping over the moon is done by Build with me blog.
This LEGO® DUPLO® cow jumping over the moon is done by Build with me blog.




Build with me blog also created this clever version of the woman who lived in a shoe.
Build with me blog also created this clever version of the woman who lived in a shoe.

Kids need to play safely

While we all love LEGO® play, introducing LEGO® sets too young not only poses something of a safety risk for children under three years of age, it also hinders their ability to make developmental progress on their own.

It can be a frustrating process for parents too as the smaller, more intricate LEGO® bricks will require that parents facilitate play, which can interrupt precious moments of discovery for your child.

DUPLO Friends castle, horse and carriage

Shop LEGO® DUPLO® sets

LEGO® DUPLO® bricks helps kids learn

LEGO® DUPLO® bricks are something of a developmental bridge for your child. Here are four broad ways that LEGO® DUPLO® play is beneficial for young children:

Fine motor skills

They offer the opportunity for kids to improve their fine motor skills through repetitive motions using blocks that are designed to aid and encourage play for this very reason.

Toddler building with DUPLO

Social skills

Playing with LEGO® DUPLO® bricks helps kids to build on their social skills through role play, sharing and teamwork.

Figure out the world

Kids spend a lot of time trying to figure out the world through experiments and deductions. LEGO® DUPLO® play encourages these thought processes and gets them to match up things like shapes and colours too.

Creativity and problem-solving

Two absolutely essential aspect of human thought are developed from a young age. LEGO ®DUPLO® bricks offer endless possibilities for experimenting and creating, offering kids the means by which they might follow one train of thought to resolve a burning question about the world, only to pursue yet another thought, seamlessly.

Consider including some LEGO® DUPLO® sets in your collection for a versatile, fun way to bridge the gap for young kids to learn through play and adults looking for great LEGO® building options.

Visit the Kiddiwinks online store









LEGO® terms and phrases you should know

Cape Town has its very own LEGO® User Group. Launched by Marick Hornsveld, this young organisation’s guiding principle is simple: to create a platform where enthusiasts can share their passion with one another.

“We aim to promote LEGO® as a hobby and learning tool for young and old and grow LEGO®’s footprint in South Africa.” – CapeLUG

Read more about what to expect at CapeLUG.

In celebration of its launch, we take a look at a few concepts and phrases commonly used in LUG circles:

LUG – LEGO User Group

Known in the LEGO® community as LUGs, groups like this act as a way likeminded individuals can share and learn about the vast possibilities around the humble brick.

RLUG – Recognised LEGO® User Group

LUGS are standardised by the LEGO® Ambassador Network into “Recognised LUGS” using three main requirements, namely, that the group be organised for a full 12 months, have no less than 20 members, and lastly, that it participates or hosts a few exhibitions, displays or conventions. The benefits of being a Recognised LUG (RLUG) will mean support for relevant projects and events that the RLUG does.

AFOL – Adult Fans of LEGO®

Adult fans constitute a significant part of the LEGO® community around the world. AFOLs are builders and collectors of LEGO® rather than passive admirers. IF you’re a fan of LEGO® but not quite an adult, then you’ll be known as:

KFOL – Kid Fan of LEGO®
TFOL – Teenaged Fan of LEGO®
YFOL – Young Fan of LEGO®

AFOLs, KFOLs and TFOLs also have names for friends and family that aren’t necessarily as enthusiastic about LEGO® as they are:

NLF – Non-LEGO® Friend
NLSO – Non-LEGO® Significant Other
NLS – Non-LEGO® Spouse

TLG – The LEGO® Group

Even the LEGO® Group has its own abbreviation.

It helps to know a few of the acronyms and abbreviations associated with the actual LEGO® pieces too:


Refers to a typical LEGO® piece used to build.


The protruding nodule on a brick that is used to fit another brick in the building process.


The base on which a LEGO® model is built. Surface area can vary, but is always a third of the height of a single brick.


The famous LEGO® figurine. LEGO minifigure walking

MOC – My Own Creation

Refers to the LEGO® models that are designed and built by LEGO® fans.

LEGO® is filled with abbreviations for all kinds of terms. To find out more of them, visit lego.wikia.com or thebrickblogger.com

Got any terms you think are essentials for LEGO® enthusiasts to know? Tell us in the comments section below.